chinese medicine tagged posts

Sick and tired of being Sick and tired?

Doing your best, but just feeling exhausted? Stress of managing life-work balance getting you (and your loved ones) down? Is your 9-5 affecting your health? Wishing you were doing what you loved, but accepting the comfort and stability of a job you don’t?

If you answered yes to any of these questions ask yourself how life would be for you if things continued so FOREVER… What would you gain and lose? How would you feel about life in 5 / 10 / 20 years?

Then ask yo...

Read More

Acupuncture for Chronic Pain Research

Article: Acupuncture for chronic pain: individual patient data meta-analysis

“Patients receiving acupuncture had less pain for back and neck pain, osteoarthritis, and chronic headache respectively. These results were robust to a variety of sensitivity analyses, including those related to publication bias.

Acupuncture is effective for the treatment of chronic pain and is therefore a reasonable referral option. Significant differences between true and sham acupuncture indicate that acupuncture is more than a placebo.”

Read More

Pediatric Acupuncture Research

This month Medical Acupuncture Journal focused the entire journal to pediatric Acupuncture.

Here are a few PDF links to the research!

Acupuncture and Integrative Medicine for Pediatric Gastroesophageal Reflux and Functional Dyspepsia

“reduction of nausea and reported reductions in pain… successfully weaned off proton pump inhibitors. The patients in this cohort tolerated acupuncture very well.”

Acupuncture as an Anesthetic Adjuvant for Pediatric Orthopedic Patients- A Pilot Study and Protocol Description

“Acupuncture was associated with smooth postoperative courses, including low levels of pain and nausea, and relatively rapid recovery from anesthesia and surgery...

Read More

Pediatric Tuina and herbs for common conditions

Our baby, Oliver, has just turned 10 months today!! It brings such joy and has breathed a new-found respect for Chinese Medicine and all that it has to offer.

Like all parents I want to make sure he is healthy, happy, and safe. He just cut his 3rd tooth and boy, oh boy was it looking rough for a minute. But my skills as an herbalist were able to bring him some much-needed quick lasting relief. What I used: Blue Poppy’s Tender Teeth as well as a clean washcloth soaked in a homemade tea of nettles, chamomile, and saffron which he sucked on. The nettles are anti-inflammatory, chamomile cooling and soothing, and saffron (or hong hua safflower if you have it) moves blood and pain. Within minutes screaming stopped! Yay!!

I also massage him every night before bed, just to keep all his blood and...

Read More

Androgenetic Alopecia

Androgenetic Alopecia: Exploring causes and psychological effects of pattern-baldness with a Western and Chinese Medicine approach.

Read More

Ginger Foot Soak Instruction

Ginger foot soak, a simple, great home care remedy for aches, pains, and colds (the kind with runny nose and aches). This lifesaver was taught to us by Dr Lillian Chang LAc, our teacher and founder of WMI.

———————————————-

What you need:

A pot of boiling water (about 6 quarts)

Knife

Two handfuls of fresh ginger

Half a handful of turmeric if you have pain

A plastic container you can fit your feet in

Two hand towels you don’t mind getting discolored

———————————————-

Instructions:

Chop ginger into small slices. I even grate some as well. Add to boiling water and simmer 5-10 minutes. If you have pain add the turmeric. Ginger moves the blood and turmeric gets rid of pain. Turmeric will color your skin and towels orange.

Pour the ginger water into plastic tub and add some water to even out tempe...

Read More

I Ching: throwing coins to follow your path

Not quite Hansel and Gretel but almost…  The I Ching [Yi (E) Jing] is also known as the Book of Changes. It is likely written in 2000-3000 BC and is one of the bases for Daoism. I find it a wonderful help in guiding me through some of life’s questions. It is meant to assist you on your path so you can be in tune with your own nature. It is really and truly wonderful

The Daoist ideal is to have crystal-clear perception that enables you to move naturally at the right time. Wasting no effort, and having clarity. Wu Wei – the art of ‘doing without action’ or doing nothing yet accomplishing everything. It means to be so in touch with our environment and the people in it that our actions flow naturally from the situation – go with the flow...

Read More

Atherosclerosis

These are some papers I have written during my graduate studies at World Medicine Institute. I am including them for your educational pleasure:

Atherosclerosis: The link between sugar, stress, high cholesterol, and the formation of atheromas (plaques).

Androgenetic Alopecia: Exploring causes and psychological effects of pattern-baldness with a Western and Chinese Medicine approach.

Read More

Four Pillars of Health

Four pillars of health

In Chinese Medicine there are four pillars of health. A good practitioner will start from top and work down, guiding the body to heal itself. Chinese Medicine is all natural, using your body’s immune system to help heal itself. There are no side effects or complications from complicated drug interactions. It may take longer, but the benefits are well-worth it!

Freedom

1. Perspective/spirituality/emotions

When the spirit is calm and the heart taken care of, health will persevere.

2. Food and nutrition

What we put in our bodies is incredibly important. What our bodies need and do not need affects the function of organs, blood, qi, and essence.

Books I recommend: The Tao of Food by &  “Healing with Whole Foods” by Paul Pitchford.

healing with whole food One suggested diet change: ...

Read More

The 12 Main Meridians

meridian-channelsChinese Medicine 

is based on an intricate system of meridians. These meridians are similar to energy highways or rivers flowing throughout our body. There are 12 main meridians and eight extraordinary/spiritual meridians. The eight extraordinary meridians are spoken about here.

The 12 main meridians are:

  • Lung
  • Large Intestine
  • Stomach
  • Spleen
  • Heart
  • Small Intestine
  • Bladder
  • Kidney
  • Pericardium
  • San Jian (Triple Warmer)
  • Gallbladder
  • Liver

Each meridian is responsible to attend to a specific part of the body, to maintain health and homeostasis, and move qi, blood, or jing (essence). If congested, like a blocked river, the meridian will cause physical, emotional, or spiritual disease...

Read More